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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 175278, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/175278
Research Article

Brain Responses to Acupuncture Are Probably Dependent on the Brain Functional Status

1Laboratory of Digital Medical Imaging, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui University of TCM, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China
2Life Sciences Research Center, School of Life Sciences and Technology, Xidian University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710071, China
3Key Laboratory of Complex Systems and Intelligence Science, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190, China

Received 31 January 2013; Revised 7 April 2013; Accepted 30 April 2013

Academic Editor: Vitaly Napadow

Copyright © 2013 Chuanfu Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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