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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 187182, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/187182
Review Article

Understanding Central Mechanisms of Acupuncture Analgesia Using Dynamic Quantitative Sensory Testing: A Review

1Stanford Systems Neuroscience & Pain Laboratory, Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 1070 Arastradero Road, Suite 200, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
2School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78701, USA

Received 24 November 2012; Revised 17 March 2013; Accepted 29 March 2013

Academic Editor: Di Zhang

Copyright © 2013 Jiang-Ti Kong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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