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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 267217, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/267217
Research Article

Inhibitive Effects of Mulberry Leaf-Related Extracts on Cell Adhesion and Inflammatory Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

1Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 11114, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 11114, Taiwan
3Graduate Institute of Applied Life Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 11114, Taiwan
4Research Center for Biodiversity, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 106, Taiwan

Received 2 August 2013; Revised 5 November 2013; Accepted 5 November 2013

Academic Editor: Joen-Rong Sheu

Copyright © 2013 P.-Y. Chao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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