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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 267959, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/267959
Review Article

Acupuncture Effect and Central Autonomic Regulation

Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine affiliated to Capital Medical University, 23 Meishuguanhou Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100010, China

Received 7 February 2013; Revised 3 April 2013; Accepted 3 April 2013

Academic Editor: Lijun Bai

Copyright © 2013 Qian-Qian Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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