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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 287358, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/287358
Research Article

Vitamin K2, a Naturally Occurring Menaquinone, Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Both Hormone-Dependent and Hormone-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois, Rockford, IL 61107, USA
2Department of Pathology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA

Received 13 March 2013; Accepted 30 May 2013

Academic Editor: Richard Pietras

Copyright © 2013 Abhilash Samykutty et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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