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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 319734, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/319734
Review Article

Characterization of Deqi Sensation and Acupuncture Effect

Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 23 Meishuguanhou Street, Dongcheng, Beijing 100010, China

Received 9 May 2013; Accepted 30 May 2013

Academic Editor: Lu Wang

Copyright © 2013 Xing-Yue Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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