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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 379291, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379291
Review Article

The Mechanism of Moxibustion: Ancient Theory and Modern Research

1Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China
2Shanghai Research Center of Acupuncture and Meridians, Shanghai 201203, China

Received 26 March 2013; Revised 23 June 2013; Accepted 3 August 2013

Academic Editor: Xinyan Gao

Copyright © 2013 Hongyong Deng and Xueyong Shen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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