Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 397268, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/397268
Research Article

Effect of Piper betle and Brucea javanica on the Differential Expression of Hyphal Wall Protein (HWP1) in Non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) Species

Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 1 April 2013; Accepted 28 May 2013

Academic Editor: Mark Moss

Copyright © 2013 Wan Himratul Aznita Wan Harun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Y. Zadik, S. Burnstein, E. Derazne, V. Sandler, C. Ianculovici, and T. Halperin, “Colonization of Candida: prevalence among tongue-pierced and non-pierced immunocompetent adults,” Oral Diseases, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 172–175, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. D. Larone, Medically Important Fungi: A Guide To Identificationedition, American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC, USA, 5th edition, 1995.
  3. C. Le Lay, B. Akerey, I. Fliss, M. Subirade, and M. Rouabhia, “Nisin Z inhibits the growth of Candida albicans and its transition from blastospore to hyphal form,” Journal of Applied Microbiology, vol. 105, no. 5, pp. 1630–1639, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. V. Krcmery and A. J. Barnes, “Non-albicans Candida spp. causing fungaemia: pathogenicity and antifungal resistance,” Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 243–260, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. E. G. Playford, D. Marriott, Q. Nguyen et al., “Candidemia in nonneutropenic critically ill patients: risk factors for non-albicans Candida spp,” Critical Care Medicine, vol. 36, no. 7, pp. 2034–2039, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. C. Van Wyk and V. Steenkamp, “Host factors affecting oral candidiasis,” Southern African Journal of Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 18–21, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  7. C. J. Nobile, H. A. Schneider, J. E. Nett et al., “Complementary adhesin function in C. albicans biofilm formation,” Current Biology, vol. 18, no. 14, pp. 1017–1024, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. J. F. Staab, S. D. Bradway, P. L. Fidel, and P. Sundstrom, “Adhesive and mammalian transglutaminase substrate properties of Candida albicans Hwp1,” Science, vol. 283, no. 5407, pp. 1535–1538, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. J. L. Snide and P. Sundstrom, “A characterization of HWP1 promoter activation in pseudohyphal cells in Candida albicans,” in Proceedings of the 8th ASM Conference on Candida and Candidiasis, p. 103, American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC, USA, 2006.
  10. M. Hasbi, “Pharmacognostic study of Brucea amarissima Merr. from Gowa (South Sulawesi, Indonesia): isolation and identification quassinoid compound by thin layer chromatography,” Research Report, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Hasanuddin University, Ujung Pandang, Makassar, 1979. View at Google Scholar
  11. G. Alam, C. J. Soegihardjo, and Sudarsono, “Detection of indole alkaloid in the callus culture of Brucea javanica (L) Merr,” in Proceedings of the Symposium Medicinal Plants Research VIII Bogor, pp. 452–456, Indonesia, 1995.
  12. L. A. Anderson, A. Harris, and J. D. Phillipson, “Production of cytotoxic canthin-6-one alkaloids by Ailanthus altissima plant cell cultures,” Journal of Natural Products, vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 374–378, 1983. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. C. S. L. Karin, S. L. Yang, M. F. Roberts, and J. D. Phillipson, “Canthin-6-one alkaloids from cell suspension cultures of Brucea javanica,” Phytochemistry, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 141–143, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. N. Dasgupta and B. De, “Antioxidant activity of Piper betle L. leaf extract in vitro,” Food Chemistry, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 219–224, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. R. Fathilah, “Piper betle L. and Psidium guajava L. in oral health maintenance,” Journal of Medicinal Plant Research, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 156–163, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. G. Santhanam and S. Nagarajan, “Wound healing activity of Curcuma aromatica and Piper betle,” Fitoterapia, vol. 61, no. 5, pp. 458–459, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. E. C. Keat, S. S. Razak, N. M. Fadil et al., “The effect of Piper betel extract on the wound healing process in experimentally induced diabetic rats,” Clinica Terapeutica, vol. 161, no. 2, pp. 117–120, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. Sarkar, R. Sen, P. Saha, S. Ganguly, G. Mandal, and M. Chatterjee, “An ethanolic extract of leaves of Piper betle (Paan) Linn mediates its antileishmanial activity via apoptosis,” Parasitology Research, vol. 102, no. 6, pp. 1249–1255, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. W. H. Himratul-Aznita, N. Mohd-Al-Faisal, and A. R. Fathilah, “Determination of the percentage inhibition of diameter growth (PIDG) of Piper betle crude aqueous extract against oral Candida species,” Journal of Medicinal Plant Research, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 878–884, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. J. R. Naglik, F. Fostira, J. Ruprai, J. F. Staab, S. J. Challacombe, and P. Sundstrom, “Candida albicans HWP1 gene expression and host antibody responses in colonization and disease,” Journal of Medical Microbiology, vol. 55, no. 10, pp. 1323–1327, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. A. Tavanti, G. Pardini, D. Campa, P. Davini, A. Lupetti, and S. Senesi, “Differential expression of secretory aspartyl proteinase genes (SAP1-10) in oral Candida albicans isolates with distinct karyotypes,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 42, no. 10, pp. 4726–4734, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. A. Schroeder, O. Mueller, S. Stocker et al., “The RIN: an RNA integrity number for assigning integrity values to RNA measurements,” BMC Molecular Biology, vol. 31, article 7, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J. M. Ten Cate, F. M. Klis, T. Pereira-Cenci, W. Crielaard, and P. W. J. De Groot, “Molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to Candida biofilm formation,” Journal of Dental Research, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 105–115, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. P. Sundstrom, E. Balish, and C. M. Allen, “Essential role of the Candida albicans transglutaminase substrate, hyphal wall protein 1, in lethal oroesophageal candidiasis in immunodeficient mice,” Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 185, no. 4, pp. 521–530, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. N. Mohd-Al-Faisal, Effects of Brucea Javanica and Piper Betel Extracts on Oral Candida Sp., MDSc Dissertation, University of Malaya, 2012.
  26. J. R. Blankenship and A. P. Mitchell, “How to build a biofilm: a fungal perspective,” Current Opinion in Microbiology, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 588–594, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. G. D. Gilfillan, D. J. Sullivan, K. Haynes, T. Parkinson, D. C. Coleman, and N. A. R. Gow, “Candida dubliniensis: phylogeny and putative virulence factors,” Microbiology, vol. 144, no. 4, pp. 829–838, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. C. Stokes, G. P. Moran, M. J. Spiering, G. T. Cole, D. C. Coleman, and D. J. Sullivan, “Lower filamentation rates of Candida dubliniensis contribute to its lower virulence in comparison with Candida albicans,” Fungal Genetics and Biology, vol. 44, no. 9, pp. 920–931, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. P. L. Fidel Jr., J. A. Vazquez, and J. D. Sobel, “Candida glabrata: review of epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical disease with comparison to C. albicans,” Clinical Microbiology Reviews, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 80–96, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus