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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 413808, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/413808
Review Article

Amyloidosis in Alzheimer’s Disease: The Toxicity of Amyloid Beta (Aβ), Mechanisms of Its Accumulation and Implications of Medicinal Plants for Therapy

1Ph.D. Program in Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2Center for Excellence in Omics-Nano Medical Technology Development Project, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, 154 Rama I Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand

Received 9 November 2012; Revised 10 April 2013; Accepted 22 April 2013

Academic Editor: Muhammad Nabeel Ghayur

Copyright © 2013 Anchalee Prasansuklab and Tewin Tencomnao. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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