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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 429186, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/429186
Research Article

The Possible Neuronal Mechanism of Acupuncture: Morphological Evidence of the Neuronal Connection between Groin A-Shi Point and Uterus

1Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute and Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, 1, Shuefu Road, Neipu, Pingtung 912, Taiwan
3Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

Received 8 November 2012; Accepted 25 January 2013

Academic Editor: Lixing Lao

Copyright © 2013 Chun-Yen Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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