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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 483105, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/483105
Research Article

Neural Encoding of Acupuncture Needling Sensations: Evidence from a fMRI Study

1Department of Radiology, Guang An Men Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China
2Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA

Received 22 February 2013; Revised 7 July 2013; Accepted 14 July 2013

Academic Editor: Lijun Bai

Copyright © 2013 Xiaoling Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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