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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 502131, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/502131
Review Article

Tai Chi Chuan in Medicine and Health Promotion

1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, 7 Chung-Shan South Road and National Taiwan University, College of Medicine, Taipei 100, Taiwan
2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital and Department of Physical Therapy, Post-Graduate Institute of Rehabilitation Science, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan

Received 16 April 2013; Accepted 29 June 2013

Academic Editor: William W. N. Tsang

Copyright © 2013 Ching Lan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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