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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 506389, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/506389
Research Article

Total and Inorganic Arsenic Contents in Some Edible Zingiberaceous Rhizomes in Thailand

1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, 447 Sri-Ayutthaya Road, Ratchathewi, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
2Department of Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Henri Dunant Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
3Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Sri-Ayutthaya Road, Ratchathewi, Bangkok 10400, Thailand

Received 26 February 2013; Revised 24 March 2013; Accepted 1 April 2013

Academic Editor: Molvibha Vongsakul

Copyright © 2013 Chomkamon Ubonnuch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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