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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 576258, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/576258
Research Article

Mindfulness and Self-Compassion in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Examining Predictors of Disability

1Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
2Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders, Massachusetts General Hospital, One Bowdoin Square, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02114, USA
3Charite University Medicine, Institute of Medical Psychology, Berlin, Germany

Received 16 May 2013; Accepted 23 August 2013

Academic Editor: Gregory L. Fricchione

Copyright © 2013 Elizabeth A. Hoge et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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