Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 732562, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/732562
Review Article

Chinese Herbal Medicine for Acute Mountain Sickness: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

1Department of Cardiology, Guang’anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, No. 5 Beixiange, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China
2Department of Gastroenterology, Guang’anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China

Received 30 September 2013; Revised 12 November 2013; Accepted 12 November 2013

Academic Editor: Gerhard Litscher

Copyright © 2013 Jie Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. S. R. Mehta, A. Chawla, and A. S. Kashyap, “Acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral oedema, high altitude pulmonary oedema: the current concepts,” Medical Journal Armed Forces India, vol. 64, no. 2, pp. 149–153, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. J. Dallimore, J. Foley, and P. Valentine, “Background rates of acute mountain sickness-like symptoms at low altitude in adolescents using Lake Louise score,” Wilderness and Environmental Medicine, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 11–14, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. R. Roach, J. Stepanek, and P. Hackett, “Acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral edema,” Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments, vol. 2, pp. 765–794, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  4. P. W. Barry and A. J. Pollard, “Altitude illness,” British Medical Journal, vol. 326, no. 7395, pp. 915–919, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. G. Roeggla, M. Roeggla, and A. Podolsky, “How can acute mountain sickness be quantified at moderate altitude?” Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, vol. 89, no. 3, pp. 141–143, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. P. H. Hackett, D. Rennie, and H. D. Levine, “The incidence, importance, and prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness,” The Lancet, vol. 2, no. 7996, pp. 1149–1204, 1976. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. B. Honigman, M. K. Theis, J. Koziol-McLain et al., “Acute mountain sickness in a general tourist population at moderate altitudes,” Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 118, no. 8, pp. 587–592, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. T. Y. Wu, S. Q. Ding, and J. L. Liu, “Who should not go high: chronic disease and work at altitude during construction of the Qinghai-Tibet railroad,” High Altitude Medicine and Biology, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 88–107, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  9. P. Bärtsch, E. R. Swenson, and M. Maggiorini, “Update: high altitude pulmonary edema,” Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 502, pp. 89–106, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. P. H. Hackett and R. C. Roach, “High-altitude illness,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 345, no. 2, pp. 107–114, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. J. R. Sutton, G. Coates, and C. S. Houston, “Lake Louise consensus on definition and quantification of altitude illness,” Hypoxia and Mountain Medicine, vol. 114, no. 13, pp. 327–330, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  12. R. C. Roach, P. Bärtsch, and O. Oelz, “The Lake Louise acute mountain sickness scoring system,” Hypoxia and Molecular Medicine, vol. 272, p. 4, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  13. J. B. West, “The physiologic basis of high-altitude diseases,” Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 141, no. 10, pp. 789–800, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. J. P. Maloney and U. Broeckel, “Epidemiology, risk factors, and genetics of high-altitude-related pulmonary disease,” Clinics in Chest Medicine, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 395–404, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. H. Xu and K. Chen, “Making evidence-based decisions in the clinical practice of integrative medicine,” Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 483–485, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. J. Wang and X. J. Xiong, “Current situation and perspectives of clinical study in integrative medicine in China,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2012, Article ID 268542, 11 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. M. Y. Liu and K. J. Chen, “Convergence: the tradition and the modern,” Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 164–165, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  18. K. J. Chen, H. Xu, M. S. Lee et al., “The potential benefit of complementary/alternative medicine in cardiovascular diseases,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2012, Article ID 125029, 1 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. H. Xu and K. J. Chen, “Complementary and alternative medicine: is it possible to be mainstream?” Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 18, pp. 403–404, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  20. K. Chen, “Clinical service of Chinese medicine,” Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 163–164, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. K. Chen, “Where are we going?” Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 100–101, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. K. J. Chen and H. Xu, “The integration of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine,” European Review, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 225–235, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. K. Chen and L. Li, “Study of traditional Chinese medicine—which is after all the right way?” Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 241–242, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. C. S. Moyer, “Weighing alternative remedies,” February 2012, amednews.com, http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2012/02/20/prsa0220.htm.
  25. S. L. Luo, P. Zheng, and J. F. Kuang, “Integrative medicine for treatment of AMS,” Journal of High Altitude Medicine, vol. 3, pp. 60–63, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  26. J. H. Gertsch, B. Basnyat, E. W. Johnson, J. Onopa, and P. S. Holck, “Randomised, controlled trial of ginkgo biloba and acetazolamide for prevention of acute mountain sickness: the prevention of high altitude illness trial (PHAIT),” British Medical Journal, vol. 328, no. 7443, pp. 797–799, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. J. P. T. Higgins and S. Green, Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, Version 5. 1. 0, The Cochrane Collaboration, 2009.
  28. J. P. T. Higgins and S. Green, Corchrane Reviewers’ Handbook 5. 1. 0, Review Manager, 2011.
  29. B. Chen, Z. J. Guo, H. Q. Huang et al., “Prevention of acute high altitude response after acute exposed to 4600 m altitudes comparison of three compound anti-hypoxic drugs,” Journal of High Altitude Medicine, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 8–11, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  30. H. R. Song, Y. S. Tang, H. M. Li et al., “Field observation of Shengnaokang pills on prevention of acute high altitude reaction,” China Pharmaceuticals, vol. 20, no. 24, pp. 28–29, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  31. Y. S. Tang, H. R. Song, and J. X. Fei, “Effect of Shengnaokang pills on prevention of acute high altitude reaction,” People′s Military Surgeon, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 46–47, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  32. W. Z. Niu, Y. Wang, Z. W. Cao et al., “Experimental effects of Shulikang capsule on prevention of acute high altitude reaction,” Journal of High Altitude Medicine, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 2–4, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  33. S. H. Li, G. N. Jin, and W. D. Li, “Prevention of AMS and enhancement of exercise ability by rhodiola,” Journal of Preventive Medicine of Chinese People's Liberation Army, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 246–249, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  34. X. Z. Zhang, H. J. Yang, Z. D. Ha et al., “Role of six different medicines in the symptomatic scores of benign form of acute mountain sickness,” Medical Journal of National Defending Forces in Northwest China, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 341–343, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  35. D. X. Zhang, Y. K. Zhang, H. J. Nie et al., “Protective effects of new compound codonopsis tablets against acute mountain sickness,” Chinese Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 148–152, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  36. Y. L. Fang, “Study on the curative effect of Xingnaojing injection for acute mountain sickness,” Modern Medicine Health, vol. 24, no. 15, pp. 2233–2234, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  37. Y. L. Fang, “Clinical effective observation of Danhong Injection in treating acute plateau sickness,” Modern Medicine Health, vol. 27, no. 19, pp. 2909–2910, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  38. H. Xu and K. Chen, “Integrative medicine: the experience from China,” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 3–7, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. X. J. Xiong, X. C. Yang, Y. M. Liu, Y. Zhang, P. Q. Wang, and J. Wang, “Chinese herbal formulas for treating hypertension in traditional Chinese medicine: perspective of modern science,” Hypertension Research, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 570–579, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  40. A. Lu and K. Chen, “Chinese medicine pattern diagnosis could lead to innovation in medical sciences,” Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 17, no. 11, pp. 811–817, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. H. Xu and K. Chen, “Integrating traditional medicine with biomedicine towards a patient-centered healthcare system,” Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 83–84, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. New Beijing Newspaper, “Beijing public hospital first put forward principal of allocating funds depending on the service quality of characteristics,” http://health.people.com.cn/GB/10063135.html.