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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 747694, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/747694
Review Article

A Systematic Review of Biopsychosocial Training Programs for the Self-Management of Emotional Stress: Potential Applications for the Military

1Samueli Institute, 1737 King Street, Suite 600, Alexandria, VA 22314, USA
2Samueli Institute, 2101 East Coast Highway, Suite 300, Corona Del Mar, CA 92625, USA
3Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Building 8, Room 5106, Bethesda, MD 20889, USA

Received 10 May 2013; Revised 26 June 2013; Accepted 22 July 2013

Academic Editor: Tobias Esch

Copyright © 2013 Cindy Crawford et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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