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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 762615, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/762615
Review Article

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Effect and Mechanisms of Acupuncture for Ovulation Induction

1Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 434, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, First Affiliated Hospital, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Harbin 150040, China

Received 29 April 2013; Accepted 23 July 2013

Academic Editor: Ernest Hung Yu Ng

Copyright © 2013 Julia Johansson and Elisabet Stener-Victorin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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