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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 765419, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/765419
Research Article

Secular, Spiritual, and Religious Existential Concerns of Women with Ovarian Cancer during Final Diagnostics and Start of Treatment

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
2Research Unit of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark
3Institute of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Greenland, Greenland
4Klinik und Poliklinik für Palliativmedizin, LMU, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 München, Germany
5Research Unit of Health, Man and Society (50%), Institute of Public Health, SDU, Odense J. B. Winsløwsvej 9B, 5000 Odense C, Denmark
6Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS), Freiburg University, Albertstraße 19, 79014 Freiburg, Germany

Received 5 July 2013; Revised 8 September 2013; Accepted 9 September 2013

Academic Editor: Harold G. Koenig

Copyright © 2013 Lene Seibaek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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