Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 893425, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/893425
Research Article

Pistacia atlantica Resin Has a Dose-Dependent Effect on Angiogenesis and Skin Burn Wound Healing in Rat

1Medical Students' Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745-319, Iran
2Physiology Research Centre, Department of Physiology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745-319, Iran
3Department of Pathology, Isfahan University of Medical Sceinces, Isfahan 81745-319, Iran
4Department of Pharmacognosy and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, School of Pharmacy, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Hezar Jarib Avenue, Isfahan 81745-319, Iran

Received 20 June 2013; Revised 7 September 2013; Accepted 14 September 2013

Academic Editor: Angelo Antonio Izzo

Copyright © 2013 Faraidoon Haghdoost et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. S. Sharafzadeh and O. Alizadeh, “Some medicinal plants cultivated in Iran,” Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 134–137, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  2. M. Tohidi, M. Khayami, V. Nejati, and H. Meftahizade, “Evaluation of antibacterial activity and wound healing of Pistacia atlantica and Pistacia khinjuk,” Journal of Medicinal Plant Research, vol. 5, no. 17, pp. 4310–4314, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. A. Delazar, R. G. Reid, and S. D. Sarker, “GC-MS analysis of the essential oil from the oleoresin of Pistacia atlantica var. mutica,” Chemistry of Natural Compounds, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 24–27, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. A. Daneshrad and Y. Aynehchi, “Chemical studies of the oil from pistacia nuts growing wild in iran,” Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, vol. 57, no. 8, pp. 248–249, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. M. Peck, J. Molnar, and D. Swart, “A global plan for burn prevention and care,” Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 87, no. 10, pp. 802–803, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. F. Wu, D. Bian, Y. Xia et al., “Identification of major active ingredients responsible for burn wound healing of Centella asiatica herbs,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2012, Article ID 848093, 13 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. M. G. Schwacha, B. M. Thobe, T. Daniel, and W. J. Hubbard, “Impact of thermal injury on wound infiltration and the dermal inflammatory response,” Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 158, no. 1, pp. 112–120, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. M. B. Witte and A. Barbul, “General principles of wound healing,” Surgical Clinics of North America, vol. 77, no. 3, pp. 509–528, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. Y. Nakajima, Y. Nakano, S. Fuwano et al., “Effects of three types of Japanese honey on full-thickness wound in mice,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2013, Article ID 504537, 11 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. A. Neub, P. Houdek, U. Ohnemus, I. Moll, and J. M. Brandner, “Biphasic regulation of AP-1 subunits during human epidermal wound healing,” Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 127, no. 10, pp. 2453–2462, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. N. S. Al-Waili, K. Salom, and A. A. Al-Ghamdi, “Honey for wound healing, ulcers, and burns; data supporting its use in clinical practice,” TheScientificWorldJournal, vol. 11, pp. 766–787, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. B. S. Nayak and L. M. Pinto Pereira, “Catharanthus roseus flower extract has wound-healing activity in Sprague Dawley rats,” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 6, article 41, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. S. Rawat and A. Gupta, “Development and study of wound healing activity of an ayurvedic formulation,” Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 26–28, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  14. S. Barrientos, O. Stojadinovic, M. S. Golinko, H. Brem, and M. Tomic-Canic, “Growth factors and cytokines in wound healing,” Wound Repair and Regeneration, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 585–601, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. S. E. Lynch, R. B. Colvin, and H. N. Antoniades, “Growth factors in wound healing. Single and synergistic effects on partial thickness porcine skin wounds,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 84, no. 2, pp. 640–646, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. J. C. Ansel, J. P. Tiesman, J. E. Olerud et al., “Human keratinocytes are a major source of cutaneous platelet-derived growth factor,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 92, no. 2, pp. 671–678, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. G. S. Ashcroft, M. A. Horan, and M. W. J. Ferguson, “The effects of ageing on wound healing: immunolocalisation of growth factors and their receptors in a murine incisional model,” Journal of Anatomy, vol. 190, no. 3, pp. 351–365, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. G. F. Pierce, T. A. Mustoe, J. Lingelbach, V. R. Masakowski, P. Gramates, and T. F. Deuel, “Transforming growth factor β reverses the glucocorticoid-induced wound-healing deficit in rats: possible regulation in macrophages by platelet-derived growth factor,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 86, no. 7, pp. 2229–2233, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. R. E. Friesel and T. Maciag, “Molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis: fibroblast growth factor signal transduction,” FASEB Journal, vol. 9, no. 10, pp. 919–925, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. A. S. Sahib, F. H. Al-Jawad, and A. A. Alkaisy, “Effect of antioxidants on the incidence of wound infection in burn patients,” Annals of Burns and Fire Disasters, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 199–205, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. A. Bishop, “Role of oxygen in wound healing,” Journal of Wound Care, vol. 17, no. 9, pp. 399–402, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. J. D. Luo and A. F. Chen, “Nitric oxide: a newly discovered function on wound healing,” Acta Pharmacologica Sinica, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 259–264, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. A. Soneja, M. Drews, and T. Malinski, “Role of nitric oxide, nitroxidative and oxidative stress in wound healing,” Pharmacological Reports, vol. 57, pp. 108–119, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. T. Koizumi, H. Goto, H. Tanaka, Y. Yamaguchi, and S. Shimazaki, “Lecithinized superoxide dismutase suppresses free radical substrates during the early phase of burn care in rats,” Journal of Burn Care and Research, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 321–328, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. British Pharmacopoeia, vol. 2, HMSO, London, UK, 1998.
  26. R. P. Adams, Identification of Essential Oil Components by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, Allured Publishing Corporation, 2007.
  27. R. Thakur, N. Jain, R. Pathak, and S. S. Sandhu, “Practices in wound healing studies of plants,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2011, Article ID 438056, 17 pages, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. D. G. Greenhalgh, K. H. Sprugel, M. J. Murray, and R. Ross, “PDGF and FGF stimulate wound healing in the genetically diabetic mouse,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 136, no. 6, pp. 1235–1246, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. W. K. Ward, M. J. Quinn, M. D. Wood, K. L. Tiekotter, S. Pidikiti, and J. A. Gallagher, “Vascularizing the tissue surrounding a model biosensor: how localized is the effect of a subcutaneous infusion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)?” Biosensors and Bioelectronics, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 155–163, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. C. D. Barro, J. P. Romanet, A. Fdili, M. Guillot, and F. Morel, “Gelatinase concentration in tears of corneal-grafted patients,” Current Eye Research, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 174–182, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. M. Muller, C. Trocme, B. Lardy, F. Morel, S. Halimi, and P. Y. Benhamou, “Matrix metalloproteinases and diabetic foot ulcers: the ratio of MMP-1 to TIMP-1 is a predictor of wound healing,” Diabetic Medicine, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 419–426, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. E. Zandifar, S. Sohrabi Beheshti, A. Zandifar, and H. S. Javanmard, “The effect of captopril on impaired wound healing in experimental diabetes,” International Journal of Endocrinology, vol. 2012, Article ID 785247, 6 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  33. J. V. Boykin Jr. and C. Baylis, “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy mediates increased nitric oxide production associated with wound healing: a preliminary study,” Advances in Skin & Wound Care, vol. 20, no. 7, pp. 382–388, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. S. Haghjooyjavanmard, M. Nematbakhsh, A. Monajemi, and M. Soleimani, “von Willebrand factor, C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, and vascular endothelial growth factor in a dietary reversal model of hypercholesterolemia in rabbit,” Biomedical papers of the Medical Faculty of the University Palacký, Olomouc, Czechoslovakia, vol. 152, no. 1, pp. 91–95, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. D. Mayrand, A. Laforce-Lavoie, S. Larochelle et al., “Angiogenic properties of myofibroblasts isolated from normal human skin wounds,” Angiogenesis, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 199–212, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. H. Loutrari, S. Magkouta, A. Pyriochou et al., “Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia inhibits growth and survival of human K562 leukemia cells and attenuates angiogenesis,” Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 86–93, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. Z. Djerrou, Z. Maameri, Y. Hamdi-Pacha et al., “Effect of virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus on experimental burn wound's healing in rabbits,” African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 258–263, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. Z. Maameri, K. Beroual, Z. Djerrou et al., “Preliminary study to assess cicatrizing activity of honey and Pistacia lentiscus fatty oil mixture on experimental burns in rabbits,” International Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 476–480, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  39. C. J. Busuioc, G. Mogoşanu, F. C. Popescu, I. Lascar, H. Pârvanescu, and L. Mogoanta, “Phases of the cutaneous angiogenesis process in experimental third-degree skin burns: histological and immunohistochemical study,” Romanian Journal of Morphology and Embryology, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 163–171, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  40. D. Most, D. T. Efron, H. P. Shi, U. S. Tantry, and A. Barbul, “Characterization of incisional wound healing in inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice,” Surgery, vol. 132, no. 5, pp. 866–876, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. T. A. Wilgus and L. A. Dipietro, “Complex roles for VEGF in dermal wound healing,” Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 132, no. 2, pp. 493–494, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. J. Huang, L. S. Li, D. L. Yang, Q. H. Gong, J. Deng, and X. N. Huang, “Inhibitory effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by PDGF-BB is involved in nitric oxide formation,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2012, Article ID 314395, 7 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. G. A. A. Ferns, E. W. Raines, K. H. Sprugel, A. S. Motani, M. A. Reidy, and R. Ross, “Inhibition of neointimal smooth muscle accumulation after angioplasty by an antibody to PDGF,” Science, vol. 253, no. 5024, pp. 1129–1132, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. Q. Lu, C. Wang, R. Pan et al., “Histamine synergistically promotes bFGF-induced angiogenesis by enhancing VEGF production via H1 receptor,” Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 114, no. 5, pp. 1009–1019, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  45. A. R. Qader and J. A. Muhamad, “Nosocomial infection in sulaimani burn hospital, IRAQ,” Annals of Burns and Fire Disasters, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 177–181, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. N. Benhammou, F. A. Bekkara, and T. K. Panovska, “Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the Pistacia lentiscus and Pistacia atlantica extracts,” African Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 022–028, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  47. B. Adorjan, Biological Properties of Essential Oils, Uniwien, 2010.
  48. A. M. Leite, E. D. O. Lima, E. L. De Souza, M. D. F. F. M. Diniz, V. N. Trajano, and I. A. De Medeiros, “Inhibitory effect of β-pinene, α-pinene and eugenol on the growth of potential infectious endocarditis causing Gram-positive bacteria,” Revista Brasileira de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 121–126, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus