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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 103491, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/103491
Research Article

An fMRI Study of Neuronal Specificity in Acupuncture: The Multiacupoint Siguan and Its Sham Point

1Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, 45 Changchunjie, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China
2Beijing Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Brain Informatics, Beijing 100053, China
3General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces, Beijing 100053, China
4Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100053, China

Received 14 May 2014; Accepted 29 July 2014; Published 26 November 2014

Academic Editor: Lijun Bai

Copyright © 2014 Yi Shan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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