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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 329746, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/329746
Research Article

Can Tongue Acupuncture Enhance Body Acupuncture? First Results from Heart Rate Variability and Clinical Scores in Patients with Depression

1Department of Acupuncture, People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China
2Research Unit for Complementary and Integrative Laser Medicine, Research Unit of Biomedical Engineering in Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, and TCM Research Center Graz, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 29, 8036 Graz, Austria
3Private Clinic Laßnitzhöhe, 8301 Laßnitzhöhe, Austria

Received 4 February 2014; Revised 17 February 2014; Accepted 25 February 2014; Published 23 March 2014

Academic Editor: Cun-Zhi Liu

Copyright © 2014 Xian Shi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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