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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 371730, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/371730
Review Article

Polyphenols as Key Players for the Antileukaemic Effects of Propolis

1Human Genome Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
2Department of Physiology, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, PMB 2254, Sokoto, Nigeria
3Department of Haematology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
4Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
5Department of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia

Received 10 November 2013; Revised 24 January 2014; Accepted 5 February 2014; Published 19 March 2014

Academic Editor: Jairo Kenupp Bastos

Copyright © 2014 Murtala B. Abubakar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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