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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 519035, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/519035
Review Article

Beneficial Effects of Rikkunshito, a Japanese Kampo Medicine, on Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Anorexia in Combination with Western Drug: A Systematic Review

Tsumura Research Laboratories, Tsumura & Co., 3586 Yoshiwara, Ami-Machi, Inashiki-Gun, Ibaraki 300-1192, Japan

Received 15 November 2013; Accepted 17 February 2014; Published 20 March 2014

Academic Editor: Isadore Kanfer

Copyright © 2014 Sachiko Mogami and Tomohisa Hattori. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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