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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 537234, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/537234
Research Article

Ergosterol Is the Active Compound of Cultured Mycelium Cordyceps sinensis on Antiliver Fibrosis

1Institute of Liver Diseases, Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 528 Zhangheng Road, Pudong New Area, Shanghai 201203, China
2Shanghai Clinical Key Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China
3E-Institute of TCM Internal Medicine, Shanghai Municipal Education Commission, Shanghai 201203, China

Received 9 July 2014; Accepted 9 September 2014; Published 15 October 2014

Academic Editor: Jae Youl Cho

Copyright © 2014 Yuan Peng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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