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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 609064, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/609064
Research Article

Irritant Contact Dermatitis Risk of Common Topical Traditional Chinese Medicines Used for Skin-Lightening: A Pilot Clinical Trial with 30 Volunteers

1School of Chinese Medicine, Graduate Institute of Chinese Medicine, Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
2Departments of Dermatology, Medical Research, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Urology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
3Department of Dermatology, Taichung Veteran General Hospital, Taichung 40705, Taiwan

Received 8 November 2013; Revised 24 February 2014; Accepted 7 March 2014; Published 10 April 2014

Academic Editor: Junhua Zhang

Copyright © 2014 Kao-Sung Tsai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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