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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 640916, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/640916
Research Article

The Effects of Massage Therapy on Multiple Sclerosis Patients’ Quality of Life and Leg Function

College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, HSc 3226 E Wing, Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E5

Received 15 November 2013; Revised 5 February 2014; Accepted 10 February 2014; Published 8 May 2014

Academic Editor: Ching-Liang Hsieh

Copyright © 2014 Brittany Schroeder et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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