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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 642942, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/642942
Review Article

Cinnamon: A Multifaceted Medicinal Plant

1Faculty of Agro Based Industry, Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, Jeli Campus, Locked Bag No. 100, 17600 Jeli, Kelantan, Malaysia
2Human Genome Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia

Received 1 January 2014; Accepted 12 March 2014; Published 10 April 2014

Academic Editor: Mohammad Amjad Kamal

Copyright © 2014 Pasupuleti Visweswara Rao and Siew Hua Gan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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