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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 650905, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/650905
Research Article

Linking Bacterial Endophytic Communities to Essential Oils: Clues from Lavandula angustifolia Mill

1Trees and Timber Institute, National Research Council, Via Madonna del Piano, No. 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Florence, Italy
2Laboratory of Microbial and Molecular Evolution, Department of Biology, University of Florence, Via Madonna del Piano 6, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Florence, Italy
3Department of Neuroscience, Psychology, Drug Research and Child Health, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence, Italy
4Center for Integrative Medicine, Careggi University Hospital, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence, Italy
5Il giardino delle Erbe, via Del Corso 6, Casola Valsenio, 48010 Ravenna, Italy

Received 17 January 2014; Accepted 29 April 2014; Published 26 May 2014

Academic Editor: Gyorgyi Horvath

Copyright © 2014 Giovanni Emiliani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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