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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 850367, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/850367
Review Article

Efficacy of Acupuncture in Reducing Preoperative Anxiety: A Meta-Analysis

1Department of East-West Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Hoegi-Dong No. 1, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
2Soram Korean Medicine Hospital M Tower Building, Samsung-Dong No. 154-11, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-879, Republic of Korea
3Department of Physiology, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Hoegi-Dong No. 1, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
4Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Hoegi-Dong No. 1, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
5Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Hoegi-Dong No. 1, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea

Received 9 May 2014; Revised 11 July 2014; Accepted 11 July 2014; Published 2 September 2014

Academic Editor: Jian Kong

Copyright © 2014 Hyojeong Bae et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce preoperative anxiety in several previous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). In order to assess the preoperative anxiolytic efficacy of acupuncture therapy, this study conducted a meta-analysis of an array of appropriate studies. Methods. Four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and CINAHL) were searched up to February 2014. In the meta-analysis data were included from RCT studies in which groups receiving preoperative acupuncture treatment were compared with control groups receiving a placebo for anxiety. Results. Fourteen publications (N = 1,034) were included. Six publications, using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State (STAI-S), reported that acupuncture interventions led to greater reductions in preoperative anxiety relative to sham acupuncture (mean difference = 5.63, P < .00001, 95% CI [4.14, 7.11]). Further eight publications, employing visual analogue scales (VAS), also indicated significant differences in preoperative anxiety amelioration between acupuncture and sham acupuncture (mean difference = 19.23, P < .00001, 95% CI [16.34, 22.12]). Conclusions. Acupuncture therapy aiming at reducing preoperative anxiety has a statistically significant effect relative to placebo or nontreatment conditions. Well-designed and rigorous studies that employ large sample sizes are necessary to corroborate this finding.