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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 857360, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/857360
Research Article

Selective Antibiofilm Effects of Lucilia sericata Larvae Secretions/Excretions against Wound Pathogens

1Institute of Zoology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 845 06 Bratislava, Slovakia
2Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Slovak Medical University, 833 03 Bratislava, Slovakia
3Scientica s.r.o., 831 06 Bratislava, Slovakia

Received 24 February 2014; Accepted 7 May 2014; Published 11 June 2014

Academic Editor: Ronald Sherman

Copyright © 2014 Jana Bohova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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