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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 872320, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/872320
Research Article

Trend and Pattern of Herb and Supplement Use in the United States: Results from the 2002, 2007, and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys

1School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University, No. 250, Wu-hsing Street, Xinyi District, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
2School of Pharmacy, National Taiwan University, Room 203, 2F, No. 33, Linsen S. Road, Zhongzheng District, Taipei 10050, Taiwan
3Department of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, No. 250, Wu-hsing Street, Xinyi District, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
4Department of Pharmacy, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, No. 250, Wu-hsing Street, Xinyi District, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
5Department of Health Policy and Administration, Washington State University, SCLS 141, 668 N. Riverpoint Boulevard, Spokane, WA 99210, USA

Received 31 July 2014; Accepted 10 October 2014; Published 10 December 2014

Academic Editor: Weena Jiratchariyakul

Copyright © 2014 Chung-Hsuen Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. In 1990s, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including use of herbs and supplements, gained popularity in the United States. However, more recent surveys suggest that demand for herbs and supplements has stabilized. Objective. This study examined the prevalence, patterns, and changes in herb and supplement use among the US adults, using the 2002, 2007, and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS). Methods. Weighted population estimates were derived from three complementary and alternative medicine supplements to the NHIS. Prevalence rates for herb and supplement use were compared, using Wald chi-square tests to measure changes between years. Results. An estimated 40.6 million US adults reported herb and supplement use in 2012. However, the rate of herb and supplement use dropped from 18.9% in 2002 to 17.9% in 2007 and 2012 (). This decline in use was more pronounced among women, racial or ethnic minorities, and adults with low incomes. Conclusion. Herb and supplements use remains common in the USA, but adult use rates are on the decline. It is still important for health care providers to ask patients about herb and supplement use.