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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 879396, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/879396
Review Article

Valerian: No Evidence for Clinically Relevant Interactions

1Working Group Efficacy, Safety and Interactions of Kooperation Phytopharmaka GbR, Plittersdorfer Straße 218, 53173 Bonn, Germany
2Medical Information and Clinical Research, Steigerwald Arzneimittelwerk GmbH, 64295 Darmstadt, Germany
3Institute of Pharmacy, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
4Center of Internal Medicine, Universitätsmedizin Rostock, 18057 Rostock, Germany

Received 8 January 2014; Revised 23 March 2014; Accepted 12 May 2014; Published 30 June 2014

Academic Editor: Igho J. Onakpoya

Copyright © 2014 Olaf Kelber et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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