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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 963967, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/963967
Review Article

Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Victims of Intimate Partner Abuse: A Systematic Review of Use and Efficacy

1Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia

Received 3 April 2014; Accepted 12 May 2014; Published 28 May 2014

Academic Editor: David Mischoulon

Copyright © 2014 Luke Duffy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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