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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 967462, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/967462
Review Article

Evaluation of Traditional Medicines for Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Drosophila Models

Department of Biological Sciences, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Republic of Korea

Received 4 October 2013; Revised 17 February 2014; Accepted 24 February 2014; Published 26 March 2014

Academic Editor: Chun Fu Wu

Copyright © 2014 Soojin Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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