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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 979730, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/979730
Review Article

Recent Updates in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders Using Natural Compounds

1Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
2Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, (IMBB), The University of Lahore, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
3Department of Biochemistry, Allama Iqbal Medical College, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
4Department of Biotechnology and Informatics, BUITEMS, Quetta, Pakistan
5Center for Research in Molecular Medicine (CRiMM), The University of Lahore, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
6Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, MaRS Centre, Toronto, Canada
7King Fahd Medical Research Center (KFMRC), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, P.O. Box 80216, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
8Human Genome Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia

Received 20 January 2014; Revised 23 March 2014; Accepted 24 March 2014; Published 23 April 2014

Academic Editor: Ibrahim Khalil

Copyright © 2014 Mahmood Rasool et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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