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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 175497, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/175497
Research Article

In Vitro Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activity of Amphipterygium adstringens

1Institute of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Avenida Universidad S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 66455, San Nicolas de los Garza, NL, Mexico
2Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública (EBMSP), Avenida Silveira Martins 3386, 41150 100 Salvador, BA, Brazil
3Chemical, Biological and Agricultural Pluridisciplinary Research Center (CPQBA), University of Campinas (UNICAMP), CP 6171, 13083-970 Campinas, SP, Brazil

Received 26 June 2015; Accepted 20 August 2015

Academic Editor: Rahmatullah Qureshi

Copyright © 2015 A. Rodriguez-Garcia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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