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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 238482, 26 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/238482
Review Article

Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

1Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, UAE
2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, UAE
3Department of Pharmacology, R. C. Patel Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research, Shirpur, Mahrastra 425405, India
4Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
5King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
6Enzymoics, 7 Peterlee Place, Hebersham, NSW 2770, Australia

Received 24 April 2015; Accepted 24 August 2015

Academic Editor: Ki-Wan Oh

Copyright © 2015 Charu Sharma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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