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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 238790, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/238790
Research Article

Influences of Deqi on Immediate Analgesia Effect of Needling SP6 (Sanyinjiao) in Patients with Primary Dysmenorrhea in Cold and Dampness Stagnation Pattern: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

1School of Acupuncture Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
2Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
3Beijing Tongren Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China
4The Key Unit of State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Evaluation of Characteristic Acupuncture Therapy, Beijing 100029, China
5School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069, China

Received 22 August 2014; Revised 9 November 2014; Accepted 19 November 2014

Academic Editor: Xinyan Gao

Copyright © 2015 Yu-qi Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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