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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 354326, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/354326
Research Article

Naringin Attenuates Autophagic Stress and Neuroinflammation in Kainic Acid-Treated Hippocampus In Vivo

1School of Life Sciences, BK21 Plus KNU Creative BioResearch Group, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Republic of Korea
2Institute of Life Science & Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Republic of Korea
3Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Republic of Korea
4Brain Science and Engineering Institute, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-842, Republic of Korea

Received 2 April 2015; Accepted 27 May 2015

Academic Editor: Michele Navarra

Copyright © 2015 Kyoung Hoon Jeong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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