Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 564648, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/564648
Research Article

Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour to Explain Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine among Hong Kong Chinese in Britain

1City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong
2The University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK
3The University of Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5TB, UK
4Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, China

Received 3 June 2015; Accepted 22 July 2015

Academic Editor: Cheryl Hawk

Copyright © 2015 Tina L. Rochelle et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Office for National Statistics, Ethnicity and National Identity in England and Wales, 2011, Office for National Statistics, London, UK, 2012, http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/dcp171776_290558.pdf.
  2. A. Nandi and L. Platt, “Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK's minority and majority ethnic groups,” Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2013-08, Economic Social Research Council, 2013, https://www.understandingsociety.ac.uk/research/publications/working-paper/understanding-society/2013-08.pdf. View at Google Scholar
  3. G. Wong and R. Cochrane, “Generation and assimilation as predictors of psychological well-being in British Chinese,” Social Behaviour, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 1–14, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  4. Department of Health, The Handbook to the NHS Constitution for England, Department of Health, London, UK, 2012.
  5. L. C. Koo, “The use of food to treat and prevent disease in Chinese culture,” Social Science and Medicine, vol. 18, no. 9, pp. 757–766, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. F. Chan, E. Mok, Y. S. Wong et al., “Attitudes of Hong Kong Chinese to traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine: survey and cluster analysis,” Complementary Therapies in Medicine, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 103–109, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. V. C. Chung, C. H. Lau, E. K. Yeoh, and S. M. Griffiths, “Age, chronic non-communicable disease and choice of traditional Chinese and western medicine outpatient services in a Chinese population,” BMC Health Services Research, vol. 9, article 207, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. T. L. Rochelle and D. F. Marks, “Medical pluralism of the Chinese in London: an exploratory study,” British Journal of Health Psychology, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 715–728, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. G. Green, H. Bradby, A. Chan, and M. Lee, “‘We are not completely Westernised’: dual medical systems and pathways to health care among Chinese migrant women in England,” Social Science and Medicine, vol. 62, no. 6, pp. 1498–1509, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. I. Ajzen, “The theory of planned behavior,” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, vol. 50, no. 2, pp. 179–211, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. Conner, S. F. L. Kirk, J. E. Cade, and J. H. Barrett, “Why do women use dietary supplements? The use of the theory of planned behaviour to explore beliefs about their use,” Social Science and Medicine, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 621–633, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. N. Hobbs, D. Dixon, M. Johnston, and K. Howie, “Can the theory of planned behaviour predict the physical activity behaviour of individuals?” Psychology & Health, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 234–249, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. P. Norman and Y. Cooper, “The theory of planned behaviour and breast self-examination: assessing the impact of past behaviour, context stability and habit strength,” Psychology and Health, vol. 26, no. 9, pp. 1156–1172, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. S. H. Ng, N. Yam, and J. Lai, “The bicultural self of Chinese in Hong Kong,” in Casting the Individual in Societal and Cultural Contexts: Social and Societal Psychology in Asia and the Pacific, J. H. Liu, C. Ward, A. B. I. Bernardo, M. Karasawa, and R. Fischer, Eds., pp. 105–122, Kyoyook-Kwahak-Sa, Seoul, Republic of Korea, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  15. C. L. K. Lam, E. Y. Y. Tse, and B. Gandek, “Is the standard SF-12 Health Survey valid and equivalent for a Chinese population?” Quality of Life Research, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 539–547, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. Census & Statistics Department, Thematic Household Survey Report No. 12, Census & Statistics Department of the Hong Kong Government, 2003.
  17. Social Services Inspectorate for Wales, Questionnaire for People Who Use Social Services, Wales Audit Office, Cardiff, Wales, 2006.
  18. M. H. Bond, The Oxford Handbook of Chinese Psychology, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 2010.
  19. D. Lai and N. Chappell, “Use of traditional Chinese medicine by older Chinese immigrants in Canada,” Family Practice, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 56–64, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. R. O'Brien, K. Hunt, and G. Hart, “‘It's caveman stuff, but that is to a certain extent how guys still operate’: men's accounts of masculinity and help seeking,” Social Science & Medicine, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 503–516, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus