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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 618409, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/618409
Research Article

Evaluation of the Anxiolytic and Antidepressant Activities of the Aqueous Extract from Camellia euphlebia Merr. ex Sealy in Mice

1School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
2Ministry of Education Center for Food Safety of Animal Origin, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116620, China
3Dalian SEM Bio-Engineering Technology Co. Ltd., Dalian 116620, China

Received 8 July 2015; Revised 14 August 2015; Accepted 16 August 2015

Academic Editor: David Mischoulon

Copyright © 2015 Dongye He et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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