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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 671094, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/671094
Research Article

Analysis of Individual Variations in Autonomic Responses to Urban and Forest Environments

1Ishikawa Prefectural Nursing University, 1-1 Gakuendai, Kahoku, Ishikawa 929-1210, Japan
2Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, Chiba University, 6-2-1 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-0882, Japan
3Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, 1 Matsunosato, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8687, Japan

Received 29 July 2015; Accepted 20 September 2015

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Caminiti

Copyright © 2015 Hiromitsu Kobayashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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