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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 717926, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/717926
Research Article

Relationship between Health Insurance Status and the Pattern of Traditional Medicine Utilisation in Ghana

Complementary and Alternative Therapy Research Unit, Department of Geography and Rural Development, PMB, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Received 3 May 2015; Revised 27 June 2015; Accepted 21 July 2015

Academic Editor: Jenny M. Wilkinson

Copyright © 2015 Razak Mohammed Gyasi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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