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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 736074, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/736074
Research Article

Characterizing Herbal Medicine Use for Noncommunicable Diseases in Urban South Africa

1South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute (SAHSMI), Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535, South Africa
2South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535, South Africa
3The South African Centre for Epidemiological Modelling and Analysis, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa
4International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH), Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185 UZP114, 9000 Gent, Belgium
5School of Pharmacy, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535, South Africa
6School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535, South Africa

Received 2 July 2015; Accepted 16 September 2015

Academic Editor: Cheryl Hawk

Copyright © 2015 Gail D. Hughes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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