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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 794729, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/794729
Research Article

Bioactive Polyphenols from the Methanol Extract of Cnicus arvensis (L.) Roth Demonstrated Antinociceptive and Central Nervous System Depressant Activities in Mice

1Natural Product Chemistry and Pharmacology Research Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Pharmacy, Northern University Bangladesh, Dhaka 1205, Bangladesh
2Phytochemistry and Pharmacology Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, Manarat International University, Dhaka 1216, Bangladesh
3Department of Pharmacy, Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology, Dhaka 1213, Bangladesh
4Chemical Research Division, BCSIR Laboratories, Bangladesh Council of Scientific & Industrial Research, Dhaka 1205, Bangladesh

Received 25 November 2014; Revised 25 December 2014; Accepted 29 December 2014

Academic Editor: Olumayokun A. Olajide

Copyright © 2015 Mahmudur Rahman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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