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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 870640, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/870640
Research Article

Decreased Cortisol and Pain in Breast Cancer: Biofield Therapy Potential

College of Nursing No. 211, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3560, USA

Received 19 December 2014; Accepted 17 March 2015

Academic Editor: Haroon Khan

Copyright © 2015 Alice Running. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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