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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 896314, 30 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/896314
Review Article

Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, and Bioactivities of Cananga odorata (Ylang-Ylang)

1Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia, 46150 Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
2Division of Genetic and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
3Biomolecular Research Group, Biochemistry Program, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 30 April 2015; Revised 4 June 2015; Accepted 9 June 2015

Academic Editor: Mark Moss

Copyright © 2015 Loh Teng Hern Tan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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