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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 976123, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/976123
Research Article

Effects of Tai Chi and Walking Exercises on Weight Loss, Metabolic Syndrome Parameters, and Bone Mineral Density: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

1Department of Sports Science and Physical Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong
2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong

Received 13 May 2015; Accepted 28 June 2015

Academic Editor: Cheryl Hawk

Copyright © 2015 Stanley Sai-Chuen Hui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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