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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 1423052, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1423052
Research Article

Evaluation of the Isoflavone Genistein as Reversible Human Monoamine Oxidase-A and -B Inhibitor

College of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA

Received 21 December 2015; Revised 8 March 2016; Accepted 10 March 2016

Academic Editor: Michele Navarra

Copyright © 2016 Najla O. Zarmouh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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