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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2146204, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2146204
Review Article

Efficacy and Safety of Chinese Medicinal Herbs for the Treatment of Hyperuricemia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

1Subsidiary Rehabilitation Hospital, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China
2College of Rehabilitation Medicine, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China
3Orthopaedics and Traumatology College, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China

Received 26 June 2016; Revised 15 August 2016; Accepted 28 August 2016

Academic Editor: Young-Su Yi

Copyright © 2016 Jianping Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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